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SARJ Schole
Filipino Baptists Perspective of Transformational Leadership
Guidelines for Holistic Ministry
Wilson D. Guanzon: A Relational Life
Foreword to CFBMTL by Rev. Edwin I. Lariza
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Filipino Baptists Perspective of Transformational Leadership
Rev. Dr.  Sergio A. Rojo, Jr., Director
Rev. Dr. Sergio A. Rojo, Jr., Director
FILIPINO BAPTISTS PERSPECTIVE
OF TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERSHIP
by Rev. Dr. Sergio A. Rojo, Jr.
Director, SARJ Schole


Introduction
Let me begin here with basic concepts of transformational leadership. Transformational leadership is initially conceptualized as sensitivity to the “purpose and direction of God, which may be revealed to them through those who have special gifts of prophecy and discernment or through the whole membership of the church.” Put another way, transformational leadership incarnates Christ-like values and objectives. Robert Ferris puts it as well, “Leaders . . . are those who are out in front. They give direction to others, rather than running to the other’s bidding. . . .” C. W. Brister puts it this way, “We need Christian leadership whose identity is conformed to the servant ‘image of Christ’ rather than to the success image of culture. Transformational leaders incarnate Christ-like values and objectives.”
Putting it aptly, transformational leadership is seeking “our transformation, the transformation of others, and transformation of the world.” This kind of leadership is captured in the prayer of world-renown evangelist Luis Palau, “It’s not what I am going to do for You but rather what You’re going to do through me.” It now appears that the ultimate purpose of transformational leadership is to lead people to reconciliation to God. Thus, we find Lon Allison’s definition of transformational leadership rather more appropriate in this context, “The God-given ability to move God’s people first to God and then to his purposes.”
Preliminaries
Transformational leadership and its contextual model from a Filipino Baptist leadership context is the focus of this paper. In this study, biblical data on Jesus’ leadership on one hand and the Filipino Baptist leadership traits, approaches, and practices, and their views of the leadership of Jesus Christ, on the other hand, will be investigated.
In its approach, this study will adapt the critical contextualization of Paul Hiebert and George Soares-Prabhus’ prophetic theologizing. The critical contextualization requires a certain contextual theme to be evaluated in the light of its biblical teaching, thereby creating a new contextualized Christian practice. Soares-Prabhu’s theologizing necessitates the interplay of situation and Scripture text, but the starting point of this dialogue must be the situation, not the text. In this case, the biblical-theological perspective of the leadership of Jesus Christ will be the theoretical framework of the dialogical study and the Filipino Baptist leadership context is the starting point only. In a word, the transformational leadership of Jesus Christ is the lens through which the Filipino Baptist leadership will be reviewed.
The present study will also seek to find the commonalities shared by Filipino Baptist leaders in the years 1950 through 2000. This study will describe and analyze the Filipino Baptist leaders’ theological thinking on leadership in order to discover their “core best practice principles.” Analysis of written materials as well as oral testimonies from interview will be used in this study. In selecting data, this researcher will be guided by an analysis of the information, which will yield evidence to the core leadership traits and approaches of the Filipino Baptist leaders. Once the commonalities are identified, they will be analyzed to become the basis for a national context of the Filipino Baptists leadership.
Moreover, this method is similar to George Soares-Prabhu’s prophetic theologizing. In Soares-Prabhu’s theologizing, “there is a dialectical interplay of situation and text, but the starting point of this dialogue must be the situation, not the text.” Wilkins explains this methodology by saying, “. . . Biblical study must always precede application, but we ought also to emphasize that application must always follow biblical study . . . .” Therefore, the biblical-theological perspective of Jesus Christ’s leadership is the theoretical framework of this research study; the Filipino Baptist leadership context is only the starting point in the process of the dialogue.
Cases of Filipino Baptists Leadership
At the outset, it should be pointed out that this researcher subscribes with C. W. Brister that “some subjectivity naturally influenced my selection process.” The subjectivism however, in the choice of the Filipino Baptist leaders to be studied, is not necessarily based on emotional attachment. Rather, the Filipino Baptist leaders under study, were chosen based on the extent of their influences in the light of the wider spectrum of leadership in the church and society. In this section, leadership traits and approaches of six Filipino Baptist leaders will be examined. They are as follows: Agustin E. Masa; Johnny V. Gumban; Edwin I. Lopez; Domingo J. Diel, Jr.; Sharon Rose Joy Ruiz-Duremdes; and Nestor D. Bunda. The goal is to discover “how each exercised particular unique ministry.”


Described as a famed and distinguished Baptist leader in East Asia, Agustin E. Masa, educated in the United States of America, was convinced that the “the Filipino can administer and strengthen churches better than the Americans because they know their own language and are adaptable to the Filipino situation.”
Those who intimately knew Johnny V. Gumban, describe as helpful, understanding, friendly, and a mentor. He likewise had a gift of presence, more precious than material possession. Gumban was the dean of the College of Theology, Central Philippine University from 1970-74. He was also president of the Convention of Philippine Baptist Churches and had also served as a pastor to churches in the Convention and in the United States of America.
Edwin I. Lopez is described as a dynamic leader and was instrumental in making the CPBC well known. His diligent performance as General Secretary of the Convention of Philippine Baptist Churches and then the Asian Baptist Federation, would attest to that. Prior to this, Lopez has had pastorate in several local churches. He was also involved in community health and development projects.
Domingo J. Diel, Jr. is one of the distinguished Filipino Baptist leaders who contributed largely in shaping the CPBC. In like manner, he has imminent leadership in the church and an ecumenical thinker, of which churches in the West use his expertise as an ecumenical scholar.
The fondest affirmation addressed to Ruiz-Duremdes is “creative writer, dynamic educator and Christian leader.” She is recognized as one of the Filipino leaders who had played an important role in strengthening the Philippine Baptist churches, particularly in women’s ministry and ecumenical movements. Being the General Secretary of the National Council of Churches in the Philippines, Ruiz-Duremdes encouraged her fellow Baptists to be reconciled and a reconciling Church.
Nestor D. Bunda is noted for his ministry in the church-related and development programs. He was mainly responsible for manuals and training guides published by several church-related development programs he has served. He is also deeply immersed in empowering others in Jesus’ ministry in the academe, seriously involved in non-government organizations and pastoral work.
In the first step of the adapted critical contextualization or prophetic theologizing, different leadership traits, approaches, and practices of the Filipino Baptist leaders in the years 1950 through 2000 were studied.
This research study will attempt to research and discover traits and practices of the Filipino Baptist leaders today and will try to strengthen or affirm them in the light of the New Testament teachings of the leadership of Jesus Christ. The transformational leadership of Jesus Christ is the lens through which the leadership of the Filipino Baptist leaders will be reviewed.
As stated earlier, this research project sought to identify the core leadership traits, approaches and practices of the Filipino Baptist leaders and their views of the leadership of Jesus Christ. The review showed leadership traits, approaches and practices are as varied and as rich as the Filipino culture itself. Although every Filipino Baptist leader under study had his or her own unique leadership traits, approaches, and practices (and distinct style too), it is however, possible to make some generalizations.
First, the Filipino Baptist leaders were called by God to the ministry. At the core in the Filipino Baptist leaders’ traits is the call of God to the ministry. Their calling does vary, from dramatic to not so dramatic experiences such as fulfilling the family’s commitment to serve the Lord (in the case of Diel and Lopez), and a dream, such as of Bunda’s. There was an instance when the Filipino Baptist leader’s calling was just unfolded against the backdrop of a lifetime such as of Ruiz-Duremdes’.
Second, they demonstrated compassionate and service-oriented life. Running through the veins of the Filipino Baptist leaders is the fiber of compassion. The Filipino Baptist leaders’ compassion that is rooted in the love of God, for the dignity of human beings and of nurturing and caring of life. This compassionate life enabled the Filipino Baptist leaders to live service-directed life. Service to God and people was the hallmark of the Filipino Baptist leaders as shown in their faithfulness to ministry tasks they were called for.
Third, though expressed in different and varied terms, the Filipino Baptist leaders viewed the leadership of Jesus Christ as transformational. It was noted earlier that one key principle of transformational leadership is for a leader to help people change for the better, to help move them from where they are to where they should be. The Filipino Baptist leaders saw this character in the life of Jesus Christ. No doubt, the Filipino Baptist leaders directed their leadership characters in the leadership of Jesus Christ.
It can be concluded that common to the leadership of the Filipino Baptists in the years 1950 through 2000, are the elements of call of God, compassion for human life and thus service-oriented life, and missiological and ecumenical approaches to leadership. It was demonstrated that call of God is the first and by far the most foundational to Filipino Baptist leadership. I can now pose several implications from the development of the Filipino Baptist leadership. The transformational leader does not choose his vocation, but rather, he is chosen by the Lord.” Bunda views call of God as always associated with the mission of propagating Jesus mission.
Christian Calling is not new and has been interpreted in many ways, context and need. The New Testament tells as that Christian calling is always associated with the mission of propagating Jesus' mission: That is to make the Kingdom Of God visible. The call is not of human want or desire but of the Holy Spirit. Jesus Himself declared his mission acknowledging the Spirit behind it (Luke 4:18). Saul and Barnabas (book of Acts) were set apart by the Holy Spirit to do missionary work for and in behalf of the church, supported by the Christian community financially, morally, spiritually etc. and the evidence of this Christian calling is by its fruits (Matthew 7). Basically then, it is not people but God who initiates the call. People are to respond to that call. And such a response is apparent by the fruits it bears.
It is evident from the survey of the Filipino Baptist leaders during the years 1950 through 2000 that call of God runs through the Filipino Baptist leadership. It also appears that call of God is a core leadership trait and is foundational to the leadership of the Filipino Baptist leaders. The Filipino Baptist leaders were strong Christians because of this call, and because they were doing some definite works, notwithstanding the difficulties and dangers they encountered for the Master. They risked “their comforts and even their lives in order to bring the gospel of Christ to people who sometimes hate and often ridicule them and their interpretation of the message of Jesus Christ.”
The other significant aspect of the Filipino Baptist leadership is compassion for human life. Compassion, which is the central doctrine of the Christian community, is where religion and ethics meet. Masa was poignant when he said, “it is only as men feel compassion for their fellow creatures who suffer social disabilities will they be disposed to make necessary social changes.” Love of fellow human beings is a potent force to a person for engaging in social development activities. Such compassion is captured in the Hiligaynon phrase, “Kalo-oy sang kabilidhon sang kabuhi.” (Being Compassionate for the intrinsic worth of human life.) We see this trait clearly in the leadership pursuits of the Filipino Baptists. It is in loving that a leader is most like Jesus Christ. Compassion is also at the core of every transformational leader. Compassion for people is the Filipino Baptist leaders’ expression of deep love, not only in searching for souls to be saved but people to be developed.
. . . Leaders will desire that Christ may be seen through them, their compassion, and will live and speak in such a way that they draw others to God. Without spiritual leadership, God’s purpose cannot be fulfilled.
. . . This is also the reason why love ranks first. And prompted by the love the pastor, imitating Christ who ‘came to seek and to save the lost’ (Lk. 19, 10), always ‘go in search of the sheep that went astray’ (Mt. 18:12), so that, according to Apostle’s word ‘be able by all means save some’ (1 Cor. 9,22).
Larry Moyer would always remind seminar participants that in making evangelism a habit instead of headache, the evangelist must develop concern for people. Robert Courson, an American Baptist missionary to the Philippines insists, “you can not help but be sympathetic when you are ministering to people.” This belief means that compassion is intrinsically at the core of the life of the Filipino Baptist leaders in the pursuit of obeying the call of God and of leading people. Thus, the Filipino Baptist leaders were self-sacrificing and dedicated.
Ecumenical and missiological approaches were the third threads that run trough the vein of the Filipino Baptist leaders. It is interesting to note that the Filipino Baptist leaders under study had different emphasis in their ecumenical approaches. Filipino Baptist leaders such as Masa, Gumban, Lopez, and in the case of Diel, would extend an ecumenical hand to fellow evangelicals, the Roman Catholics, and the Muslims. Ruiz-Duremdes and Bunda, on other hand, would open themselves to ecumenical fellowship and dialogue to, not only the evangelicals, the Roman Catholics, and the Muslims but to different ideologies.
The Filipino Baptist leaders in general, thought that mission is the mission of the Church of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and therefore comes from God. Since the mission is of the Body of Christ, there appeared to be consensus in the Filipino Baptist leaders that mission must be undertaken by all, not by only few. As well, the Filipino Baptist leaders understood the mission of Christ to be directed to all – an inclusive perspective.
Christ, the Logos, entered history because of his genuine love and concern for people. (John 3:16) so that they may be able to experience a life in abundance (John 10:10). Christ’s mission was inclusive based on love. It was a mission which Christ himself put into practice.
In a word, the Filipino Baptist leaders were growing in the character of Jesus Christ.
Biblico-Theological Foundation
of the Leadership of Jesus Christ

The articulation of a biblical perspective of Jesus’ leadership is foundational to the pursuit of understanding of both the leadership of Jesus Christ and the Filipino Baptists. This section of the study focuses on the family life of Jesus Christ, his calling from the Father, his understanding of leadership traits, approaches, and practices to leadership.
The idea of presenting the family lineage of Jesus was to prove his standing as one of God’s chosen people. It is a fact that “family lines and family names were important to the Jews.” Like any other Jewish family, Jesus went through several ceremonies soon after his birth. Although Jesus Christ was from Above, his family carried out these ceremonies according to God’s law and thus he fulfilled perfectly.
Masa would summarize the family life of Jesus Christ in the following manner:
The Scripture is categorical that that he was born of the seed of David a tacit admission of his humanity. His life is represented accordingly as a life of difficulty and conflict, of trial and suffering, issuing in a shameful death. But he accepted this kind of life because he had a mission which could be accomplished alone by such kind of life. He came into this world on a mission of mercy to sinful man. Such a mission was in its issuance of humiliation at every step of its accomplishment.
In Luke’s account, Jesus was quoting from Isaiah and he clearly claims to fulfill the Isaianic prophecy. But Jesus went beyond the prophetic calling; thus, he boldly announces, “Today this Scripture is fulfilled in your hearing” (Luke 4:20). He is proclaiming himself as the One who would bring the good news.
Jesus Christ expresses his calling from God, the Father (John 20:21). His calling from God, the Father had been the basis for his authority.
Jesus “came to secure the salvation of the world by becoming the Second Adam and giving His life for many (see Romans 5:12-21),” thus giving “total welfare for mankind.” And “He accepted the Father’s will as it was disclosed to him step by step along the path of obedience in the circumstances of the place and time in which he was.”
At the outset it should be stated,
. . . The question of Christ’s deity is therefore the question about Jesus Christ. The question does not mean that Jesus must be approached in some mystical way. On the contrary, we must approach him as true man within the context of history, a man who actually said and did things. But we will not understand him even in that context until we recognize that he is also God and that his divinity alone gives meaning to his speech and action.

Blackaby & Blackaby say, “Jesus Christ exemplified the unpretentious life the heavenly Father honors in his servants. The only person in history with justifiable reason to exalt himself was the Lord Jesus, God’s only son. Yet he chose to live and die in extreme humility . . . .”
Vestal also writes,
Jesus presents Himself to us not only as God’s representative or God’s servant but as one whose relationship to God, origin from God is unlike any other human being who has ever lived. Jesus presents Himself to us as the one by His death on the cross is the world’s Savior. Jesus offers Himself as the one who because of His obedience to God in death reconciles us to God. He is resurrected after crucifixion and offers His eternal and abiding presence to all who will receive it.

As a matter of fact, Jesus Christ is the greatest leader in the world, and in leadership, he is the supreme pattern for human life.
Servanthood is at the core of who Jesus was. In response to James’ and John’s request, Jesus Christ redefined greatness in terms of service. He emphatically taught in Mark 10:43b-45:
Instead, whoever wants to become great among you must be your servant and whoever wants to be first must be slave of all. For even the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many. (Mark 10:43-45).

In today’s materialistic world, greatness is measured when one hold high position. In Jesus Christ’s Kingdom, true greatness comes in serving others. Gene Wilkes writes,
You are great when you serve. You are first when you are a slave. Jesus taught this to His closest disciples. These men, had accepted Jesus’ call to follow him. They would lead others in the work of God after Jesus ascended to the right hand of the Father. How they understood leadership among God’s people was crucial to how Kingdom people would live together in generations to come.

Similarly, “Jesus told them that true greatness comes in serving others . . . In Christ’s kingdom, however, service is the way to get ahead. And Jesus Christ put to practice his teaching by washing the feet of his disciples (John 13:5). “Towel ministry” authenticated Jesus Christ’s understanding of leadership. Jesus Christ put to practice his teachings on leadership by washing the filthy feet of his disciples. (John 13:5).
The Scriptures depict the life of Jesus and more so his leadership. Compassion, as an expression of deep love, moved Jesus to be responsive to the spiritual need and physical needs. Compassion is splanchniomai, which means “to be moved with compassion, to yearn with compassion, is frequently recorded of Christ towards the multitude and towards individual sufferers . . .”
In the same manner, Jesus was moved with pity because the crowd was with him for three days already and they have nothing to eat (Mark 8:2-3), and to the appeal of two blind men for healing (Matthew 20:34). Jesus was seen going through “all the towns and villages, teaching in their synagogues, preaching the good news of the Kingdom and healing every disease and sickness” (Matt. 9:35). In fact, compassion is the motive to the three characteristics of the ministry of Jesus Christ. The above-stated biblical accounts demonstrate Jesus Christ’s compassionate life and naturally made him quite concerned to these people’s needs. His healing stories were a sign of compassionate life, indeed.
Moreover, in the parable of the Good Samaritan, Jesus passionately stresses the whole point of love. He was saying that the meaning of love requires meeting the person’s need. This truth teaches us that whenever he or she lives, the follower of Jesus has good reason to help the needy because of the compelling spirit of the love of Jesus Christ.
At the core of his life here on earth, Jesus Christ understood well his mission. His mission was sharply focused: faithfully doing about his Father’s business. The way Jesus spoke and acted makes us think of him as missiological: missiological in that Jesus had met (and still is meeting) the physical needs of people and the community as an approach to leadership. In the Bible, Jesus instructed his twelve disciples and reached out the town of Galilee (Mathew11:1; Mark 1:38-39) and moved from one village to another (Mark 7:24-32).
Jesus was also concerned about bringing disciples to the Father, so that they could develop intimate relationship with Him that Jesus himself enjoyed. Citing John 14:8-11, Blackaby and Blackaby point out, “His task [Jesus] was to bring his disciples face to face with the Father so they could develop the same intimate relationship with him that Jesus enjoyed . . . .”
The prayer in chapter 17, verse 11 of John is popularly known as Christ’s prayer for unity. Alienated relationships among Christ’s disciples and all those who follow him is the context of his prayer. This situation is the negative reality of Jesus’ prayer. The positive aspect of the prayer is for the disciples to work out such a prayer in order to be united in harmony and love. Jesus’ prayer also has the vision of cultivating and maintaining unity in diversity across peoples of the world. In view of the above, a question was asked: how could Jesus’ prayer be answered? Billy Kim, President of the Baptist World Alliance, declares, “I believe the answer is Christ himself. The solution comes from understanding how Christ made us one in the first place.” Put similarly, what was the ecumenical approach of Jesus Christ? Jesus Christ’s ecumenical approach to leadership was inclusive because he went beyond the Jewish’s exclusivist way. Jesus Christ expressed as well, his ecumenical thought in his response to John’s attempt at stopping a man who was driving out demons by saying, “Do not stop him for whoever is not against you is for you” (Luke 9:50). Jesus Christ who was encouraging his disciples to have open arms attitude towards ministry workers outside of one’s group. Exclusivist attitude has no room in Jesus Christ’s leadership pursuits.
Consider the greatest commandment Jesus Christ proclaimed, “Love the Lord God with all heart and with all your soul and with all your mind . . . Love your neighbor as yourself. All the Law and the Prophets hand on these two commandments” (Matt. 22:37-40). He understood service to be a natural out-flowing from one’s love of God. Instead of hesitation and indecision, “We should concentrate on all we can do to show our love for God and others.”
Service flows from the love of Jesus Christ for all peoples. Intrinsic to his love, Jesus Christ was concerned about the soul as well as the physical well-being of the whole being of every person, thus, his missiological approach. A telling sign of his concern is Jesus Christ’s love for every person who came his way. Since his redemption is all-inclusive, it is indeed, an ecumenical approach. Jesus Christ, therefore, leads in missiological and ecumenical approaches in accomplishing the Father’s will.
Consider the greatest commandment Jesus Christ proclaimed, “Love the Lord God with all heart and with all your soul and with all your mind . . . Love your neighbor as yourself. All the Law and the Prophets hand on these two commandments” (Matt. 22:37-40). He understood service to be a natural out-flowing from one’s love of God. Instead of hesitation and indecision, “We should concentrate on all we can do to show our love for God and others.”
Service flows from the love of Jesus Christ for all peoples. Intrinsic to his love, Jesus Christ was concerned about the soul as well as the physical well-being of the whole being of every person, thus, his missiological approach. A telling sign of his concern is Jesus Christ’s love for every person who came his way. Since his redemption is all-inclusive, it is indeed, an ecumenical approach. Jesus Christ, therefore, leads in missiological and ecumenical approaches in accomplishing the Father’s will.
Filipino Baptists Perspective of
Transformational Leadership

At the outset, the following should be quoted here.

In the Old Testament, a rich range of leaders emerges. Some of these types are, in an organizational sense, minor and others major. Prophets and prophetesses are highly visible biblical leaders. These reformers overlapped into both religious and political issues. Their leadership styles weren’t developed in organizational settings and, therefore, are difficult to translate without major modification into today’s local church settings.

Peter Nott writes:
It is impossible of course to construct a systematic doctrine of leadership adequate for today’s purpose from the Old and New Testaments alone. But the sources for an understanding of Christian leadership are there, and from them it may be possible to indicate styles and methods which are both true to Christian origins, though enlightened by more contemporary studies, and related to the present needs.

The foregoing is the rationale behind developing a contextual Filipino Baptist model of transformational leadership. A contextual Filipino Baptist model of transformational leadership is intertwined principles from both the biblical image of Jesus’ leadership and its expressions in the Filipino Baptist leadership context. The following arguments support understanding of the concept of contextual leadership model.
Viewing religion as an ideological system and is related to a wider social structure of which is a part, Pertierra writes:
. . . The interplay of economic, political and cultural factors explain why religion in Zamora [a community in Ilocos Region, Philippines]has undergone certain transformations while at the same time, retaining invariant features. Thus, while Christianity has taken over most areas of public life, private-domestic rituals retain much of their indigenous orientation . . . .

Bunda, on the other hand, maintains that “. . . Christianity as a missionary religion can and must be understood and interpreted as intertwined within a specific situation, i.e., culture and history, in order to perpetuate the story of Jesus.”
In refuting the reasoning that the “teaching of the New Testament cannot be authoritative because everything there written is conditioned by the cultural situation which is not ours,” Newbigin argues,
How absurd it is to imagine that there might be available to us some perceptions of truth which are not culturally conditioned, which are not communicated to us through the minds of human beings – as human beings - are necessarily part of one culture in one set of circumstances . . . .

In his article in International Bulletin of Missionary Research, Newbigin also writes,

To discuss ‘religions’ as though they were a separate entity from the entire life of human communities is possible only in a society that has accepted the privatization of religion typical of modern Western culture. It is wholly inappropriate to the great world faiths. Equally, to discuss ‘culture’ as a matter of separate from human behavior as a whole presupposes that division of human life into private and public . . . .

The theoretical orientation of the model used in this research study draws from the above works, and views this contextual transformational leadership model as a system of interfacing elements reconstructed from biblical heritage and socio-cultural and historical construction. This model sees socio-cultural and historical construction on the one hand and biblical truths and heritage on the other hand as “constituting one reality”. Or this model could be understood in the language of the dynamic equivalence tradition:
In order to achieve this [translating the New Testament in Today’s German], it has been necessary for the translation to diverge from the linguistic form of the original, so as to reproduce the content more faithfully in the receptor language. This is known as ‘dynamic equivalent translation’. . . .

This theoretical orientation means that the Filipino Baptist leadership traits, approaches and practices must reflect biblical elements as well as cultural elements. The biblical teachings become the framework on which the Filipino Baptist transformational leadership model is built. Since culture is pivotal to the process of contextualization, it should be considered as socio-cultural and historical construct of transformational leadership in the Filipino Baptist leadership context. Put it another way, the contextual Filipino Baptist model of transformational leadership is a socio-cultural and historical construction of Jesus’ transformational leadership within the framework of the Filipino Baptist leadership context.
In a way, the Filipino Baptist leadership and the leadership of Jesus Christ converges in the contextual Filipino Baptist model of transformational leadership. Central to this pursuit is the desire to be faithful to the Word of God but at the same time, to be relevant to the Filipino culture. It is not to veer away from seeking truths in the Scripture but to make our theology and understanding alive and dynamic and see it actually working in our daily life. The Asian Theological Association puts it well, “To be faithful to the Word of God and to be relevant to our cultures, all theological reflection should be patterned on ‘the Word made flesh’ . . . [to] enable the Bible to speak relevantly to its context.” The whole process therefore, will somehow enrich one’s understanding of both Jesus’ transformational leadership and the Filipino Baptist transformational leadership.
The section below provides a description of the findings and results of the ministry project and an evaluation of how well it accomplished the intended results.
In view of the findings of this study, this researcher has developed a contextual Filipino Baptist model of transformational leadership. The Filipino Baptist model of transformational leadership contains Jesus’ leadership and its socio-cultural and historical construction from the Filipino Baptist leadership context. In a sense, the contextual Filipino Baptist model of transformational leadership is an expression of how the Filipino Baptist leaders interpreted the transformational leadership of Jesus Christ.
The Filipino Baptists Model of Transformational Leadership is visually portrayed in the following diagram:











The diagram shows two broken-lined circles, interlocking to each other. At the center of the inter-locking, broken-lined circles are traits such as call of God (Bahala Na) and compassionate (Kalu-oy; Maayong Kabubut-on) and service-oriented life (Bayanihan Spirit).
Traits such as call of God (Bahala na ang Dios), and compassionate (Kalu-oy; Maayong Kabubut-on) and service-oriented (Bayanihan spirit) life are the socio-cultural and historical construction in the Filipino Baptist leaders, which are interfacing into the biblical heritage of the leadership of Jesus Christ. These elements are at the core of the Filipino Baptists Model of Transformational Leadership;
Common to Jesus Christ and the Filipino Baptist leaders are missiological (Bugsay Padulong sa Kaginhawaan) and ecumenical (Baranganic model) approaches to leadership. These elements are at the outer side of the Model;
The biblical-theological perspective of the leadership of Jesus Christ and its socio-cultural and historical construction in the Filipino Baptist leaders are the composite elements which are “constituting one reality,” in the Filipino Baptists Model of Transformational Leadership (FBMTL);
The FBMTL contains the biblical-theological heritage of the leadership of Jesus Christ and its socio-cultural and historical construction in the Filipino Baptist leadership. The Model is now finally described:
The Filipino Baptists and transformational leader, because of his or her bahala na ang Dios attitude to the ministry, demonstrates kaluoy and maluluy-on nga kabubut-on, and bayanihan spirit while at the same time, building encroaching influences of God with people, in bugsay padulong sa kaginhawaan and baranganic approaches, to God first and then to his purposes.
Conclusion
The ultimate goal for this research study was to come up with a Filipino Baptists model of transformational leadership.
Findings show that the Filipino Baptist leadership traits, approaches and practices interfaced with the elements of the biblical image of the leadership of Jesus Christ. It follows that the biblical perspective of Jesus Christ’s leadership could be contexualized in the Filipino Baptists context. It was proven that Jesus’ transformational leadership finds dynamic equivalence in the spirituality and culture of the Filipino Baptists such as a.) compassion (Kalu-oy; Maayong kabubut-on); b.) service (Bayanihan spirit); c.) ecumenical (baranganic) approach; d.) missiological (bugsay padulong sa kaginhawaan) approach; e.) call of God to follow His will (bahala na ang Dios).

Final Note:
Undertaking a research on the leadership of the Filipino Baptists is actually preserving their socio-cultural and historical heritage. This researcher understands that God, in his countenance, is using the Baptist confessional line in appropriating and propagating the biblical heritage of the transformational leadership of Jesus Christ. Since “[t]he role of spiritual influence and God’s inspiration are critical as we pursue our stated goal of acquiring knowledge while maintaining zeal,” this researcher is confident that God will continue to use the Baptist tradition in the transformed life of the Filipino Baptist leaders today and the emerging Filipino Baptist and transformational leaders in the future in carrying out the mission of the Lord and Savior Jesus Christ here in the Philippines and to the ends of the earth.


























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